Baby Shanghai

  • Posted on July 29, 2014 at 2:03 am

Miguelin was devised by the filmmaker Isabel Coixet to symbolize the future of cities. It was one of the great attractions of the Pavilion of Spain at the Expo in Shanghai in 2010. The baby, from more than six meters in height, is part of a temporary exhibition that opens this Sunday. This will feature objects and content that will be (included Miguelin) part of the future Museum of the Expo. The promised return of the Expo Shanghai 2010, the international event that last year saturated with their record numbers of the economic capital of China life, you’re ready with an exhibition of two years showing its main attractions, including the Spanish Miguelin. Giant Baby roboticized, 6.5 meters in height, which blinks, gestures and moves his face, his head and his arms through a technology that reminds of the dinosaurs of Hollywood cinema, was devised by the filmmaker Isabel Coixet to symbolize the future of cities. Miguelin, or Xiaomi baobao in mandarin (the baby like or small Mi), quickly became a symbol of the flag of Spain in the Expo and one of the most remembered and photographed in the event objects, and it was visited by more than 7 million people.

On October 25 last year, a few days before the end of the Expo, Spanish Deputy Minister, Elena Salgado, he ceded it to the organizers Shanghainese, along with other objects, so that it was part of the funds for a future Museum of the Expo, which would be built by 2012. By now its definitive creation has not been announced, but already has a director, Liu Xiuhua, who this week appeared in the local press of Shanghai to announce that this Sunday opens its doors a huge temporary exhibition about two years with what appear to be the contents of that Museum, including Miguelin. Located in what was the Pavilion of the footprints, the secondary enclosure of the Expo of urban best practice area, dedicated to cities and pavilions of companies, the sample of 20,000 square meters, hopes now attract about 10,000 daily visitors, even double in non-working days.

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